HOW TO PROTECT CHILDREN FROM SEXUAL ABUSE

Approximately 60% of Black girls experience sexual abuse by age 18. Every 92 seconds, an American is sexually assaulted. And every 9 minutes, that victim is a child. 60 percent is huge! So, when they say our community is broken, it is. Broken hearts, broken morals and broken spirits!

If we want to build our community to be stronger as a whole, let’s start with protecting our children.  We live in a broken society that is “okay” with raping children. If it were NOT okay the sexual abuse numbers wouldn’t be so high! This is NOT an opinion, it’s a fact! I’m not saying everyone is okay with it but what I’m saying is a LARGE number of predators are sitting right in your face and many are doing NOTHING about it!

For every African-American woman who reports her rape, at least fifteen African-American women do not report theirs. They go unreported because when women tell, they aren’t believed! Nobody does anything about it! Families stay quiet and want to pray about it! Prayer doesn’t fix the hurt and damage that’s been done, sorry, and neither does NOT dealing with the predator!

Here are some great tips parenting tips by www.aap.org

Tips that can minimize your child’s risk of molestation:

  • In early childhood, parents can teach their children the name of the genitals, just as they teach their child names of other body parts. This teaches that the genitals, while private, are not so private that you can’t talk about them.
  • Parents can teach young children about the privacy of body parts, and that no one has the right to touch their bodies if they don’t want that to happen. Children should also learn to respect the right to privacy of other people.
  • Teach children early and often that there are no secrets between children and their parents, and that they should feel comfortable talking with their parent about anything — good or bad, fun or sad, easy or difficult.
  • Be aware of adults who offer children special gifts or toys, or adults who want to take your child on a “special outing” or to special events.
  • Enroll your child in daycare and other programs that have a parent “open door” policy.  Monitor and participate in activities whenever possible.
  • As children age, create an environment at home in which sexual topics can be discussed comfortably. Use news items and publicized reports of child sexual abuse to start discussions of safety, and reiterate that children should always tell a parent about anyone who is taking advantage of them sexually.
  • If your child discloses any history of sexual abuse, listen carefully, and take his or her disclosure seriously. Too often, children are not believed, particularly if they implicate a family member as the perpetrator. Contact your pediatrician, the local child protection service agency, or the police. If you don’t intervene, the abuse might continue, and the child may come to believe that home is not safe and that you are not available to help.
  • Support your child and let him or her know that he or she is not responsible for the abuse.
  • Bring your child to a physician for a medical examination, to ensure that the child’s physical health has not been affected by the abuse.
  • Most children and their families will also need professional counseling to help them through this ordeal, and your pediatrician can refer you to community resources for psychological help.
  • If you have concerns that your child may be a victim of sexual abuse, you should talk with your pediatrician. Your physician can discuss your concerns, examine your child, and make necessary referrals and reports.

PARENTS, WE ALL HAVE TO DO A BETTER JOB AT KEEPING OUR KIDS SAFE!

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